Focus - Focus: Dora García - | Tabakalera - Donostia / San Sebastián

Focus: Dora García

Dora Gacía

"Fahrenheit 451 by François Truffaut is the film that I have seen most times in my life. The original story by Ray Bradbury and the adaptation made by Truffaut have greatly influenced my work in performance and artistic production. Many works have come out from my obsession with this story and this film: Fahrenheit 451 (2002), a sculpture that re-edits Bradbury's book but printed upside down; The Glass Wall (2002);  Proxy (2001); Zimmer, Gespräche (2006) ... and many other works in which the influence is much more indirect. The character played by Julie Christie talking to the television, that world without words and made only by images, the red color so linked to the cinematographer Nicolas Roeg, the fact that the two main female characters, and opposites - the rebel, the conformist, the lover, the wife - are interpreted by the same actress; the vision of a "kind" totalitarianism, and the magnificent character of the boss of Montag, Captain Beatty, a sophisticated model of evil, who knows and practices what he pursues, and that still continues to torment me today. A perfect film that, in its perfection, it was even a great commercial failure.

My relationship with Asylum started much later and has to do with my learning of what a documentary is. I have never studied film or video and when I started making videos and then movies using digital formats I had no other training than my love for the movies I had seen. In 2010, when I "perpetrated" my first documentary, The Deviant Majority, both by theme and political affinity, Peter Robinson's film which documents Kingsley Hall's antipsychiatric experiment was my main and almost unique guide. In Asylum, the shooting team lives, cohabits and co-thinks with the people and the situation that is filming. It is a way of filming with camera in hand, with the main objective of minimizing the cinematographic apparatus, and achieving a maximum confidence with the object that is documented, to the point that the camera lives between them, it is a part of the circle, it is one of them. The influence of this way of filming and coexisting with the "object" is stronger in The Joycean Society than in The Deviant Majority, although the latter also has anti-psychiatry as its theme".

Dora García